Arts & Entertainment

Arts & Jazz Festival set for Saturday at Freeman

The seventh annual Arts & Jazz Festival will hit the Freeman Stage at Bayside in West Fenwick this weekend, showcasing live jazz performances and local artists.

BART returns to Dickens Parlour Theatre for third season

For its third year, the Bethany Area Repertory Theatre (BART) will be gracing the stage at Millville’s Dickens Parlour Theatre.

‘Macbeth’ set to bubble on the beach

Coastal Point • Submitted: Brown Box Theatre Project will be bringing ‘Macbeth’ to the Indian River Life-Saving Station on Thursday, Sept. 18, at 7:30 p.m. Above, the three witches gather ’round the cauldron to cast a spell.Coastal Point • Submitted: Brown Box Theatre Project will be bringing ‘Macbeth’ to the Indian River Life-Saving Station on Thursday, Sept. 18, at 7:30 p.m. Above, the three witches gather ’round the cauldron to cast a spell.“Double, double, toil and trouble” — the witches’ caldron will bubble on the beach at the Indian River Life-Saving Station on Thursday, Sept. 18, at 7:30 p.m., and those who attend can bring a beach chair, blanket, picnic and friends.

For the fourth year, the Brown Box Theatre Project is bringing free outdoor performances of a different Shakespeare play to Delmarva. This year, we are being treated to “Macbeth,” Shakespeare’s spellbinding vision of ambition, treachery, mystery and magic.

Whether one’s last connection with Shakespeare was in high school or you are a devotee of the bard, audiences are consistently delighted by Brown Box’s innovative, enthusiastic, youthful and totally professional treatment of every scene.

The Brown Box Theatre Project was founded in 2009 by Kyler Taustin, who grew up on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and graduated from Emmerson College’s theater directing program. He saw a need for classical and contemporary theater to be equally available for all members of any community, not just the privileged few.

Ice, ice bucket: Wilgus Associates get frosty for a friend

Coastal Point • Laura Walter : Wilgus Associates employees participated in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, in honor of their friend and co-worker, Tim Hill, the company’s vice president who has been diagnosed with ALS.Coastal Point • Laura Walter : Wilgus Associates employees participated in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, in honor of their friend and co-worker, Tim Hill, the company’s vice president who has been diagnosed with ALS.There have been many people spilling buckets of ice water on their heads lately. Locally, Wilgus Associates, an insurance, property management, real estate company, recently added another 40 people to the nationwide roster of people who have done the Ice Bucket Challenge for ALS. But Wilgus Associates did it for a loved one: their own Tim Hill, company vice president.

“Some people think it’s kind of a fad on the Internet, but it’s real people who have this debilitating, 100 percent fatal disease,” said Hill.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or “Lou Gehrig’s disease,” is a neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Eventually, the brain is unable to control, or even initiate, movement in the muscles, often leading to paralysis.

Civil War Profiles: The Delaware Military Academy controversy

The state legislature approved the creation of a military school for young men in Wilmington in 1859, but its contribution to education in Delaware was short-lived. It could not survive the increasingly confrontational political atmosphere following the outbreak of hostilities between the states.

Sea glass jewelry classes offered September 21

One of the most popular activities in Delaware Seashore State Park is to comb the undeveloped beaches for seashells and other signs of marine life. Occasionally, park visitors are lucky enough to spot pieces of sea glass that have washed up in the surf.

Film festival sneak peek offered at Oct. 4 event

The Rehoboth Beach Film Society announced this week that this year’s Catch Festival Fever fundraiser will take place at the Fort Miles Battery 519 in Cape Henlopen State Park on Saturday, Oct. 4, from 5 to 7 p.m.

Guild’s Night of Songs & Stories, Sept. 16, to focus on ‘Doors’

On Tuesday, Sept. 16, the Rehoboth Beach Writers’ Guild will host another night of “Songs & Stories” at Annabella’s in Lewes (1201 Savanah Road). The event, which starts at 7 p.m. and lasts until about 8:30, is free and open to the public.

South Bethany opens its own little library

Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark : South Bethany resident Lori Cicero came up with the idea to put a little library near town hall, and the town’s Community Enhancement Committee agreed to have one installed. Residents and visitors can stop by and take or leave a book at any time.Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark : South Bethany resident Lori Cicero came up with the idea to put a little library near town hall, and the town’s Community Enhancement Committee agreed to have one installed. Residents and visitors can stop by and take or leave a book at any time.Residents and visitors to South Bethany no longer have to travel to neighboring communities to enjoy the offerings of a library. Last week, the town’s Free Little Library was installed on Evergreen Road, near town hall, welcoming community members to enjoy free books at their leisure.

“This idea was brought to the Community Enhancement Committee by one of our members, Lori Cicero,” said Councilwoman Sue Callaway, who chairs the committee.

Cicero said she had seen similar little libraries over the last few years, and thought the concept would work well for the town.

“I walk my dog at Northside Park and saw it again last year. I thought, you know, this would be a nice thing for the community.”

The concept is, provide a box somewhere in a community, where books may be taken or shared free of charge.

“It’s supposed to be take a book or leave a book… or not. But they’re there to take,” she said. “It’s like a service to the community.”

Cicero brought the idea to the Community Enhancement Committee (CEC), where it was embraced, and fellow committee member Pat Weisgerber volunteered her husband’s woodworking skills for the job.

Herlihy’s revolutionary ‘Buck Board’ turns 10

Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark  : Colin Herlihy and Eric Simons go over some notes after the last Bethany Skim Jam of the summer.Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark : Colin Herlihy and Eric Simons go over some notes after the last Bethany Skim Jam of the summer.Chances are, if you follow board sports, you know who Colin Herlihy is. You’ve seen him in the newspapers and in the magazines. You’ve seen him in surf movies and documentaries and pretty much anything else there is to be seen in.

Chances are you also know that he’s got his own signature bodyboard model from Toobs or you’ve noticed the deer logo on the front of one of those boards under the arm of a grom headed to the beach.

But what you may not know is that, while that deer logo is a symbol, it’s not just a symbol for the Herlihy board, or even Herlihy himself, but a symbol for all of Sussex County. A symbol designed to remind people of an idea that was launched long before its time, and of two kids from the backwoods of Delaware with a passion for riding waves, and a dream.

“Just the other day, I was sitting on the beach in Fenwick, watching these guys skimming and stand-up surfing the Buck Boards, having such a good time, and was thinking about this story and how things like this evolve and how much fun and joy people can have from putting a few ideas in motion,” said Eric Simons, who was instrumental in a long trial-and-error design process that resulted, now more than 10 years ago, in the first Herlihy prototype. “I think it’s pretty cool to be part of something like that.”

A lifelong waterman and friend of Herlihy’s, Simon’s involvement in what would turn out to be a revolutionary endeavor for bodyboards and bodyboarders began long before either of their careers in the surfing industry did.

Before there were Go Pros and Instagram and “Stacking Clips,” before the Bethany jetties were destroyed for beach replenishment, and before Herlihy ever won a contest or charged Hurricane Sandy or even sported a sticker on his board — it all started with the two of them, when they were groms themselves, trying to balance their bodyboards on their bicycle handlebars as they made their way to the beach.

Civil War Profiles: Burton, Cannon & Saulsbury: Delaware’s wartime governors

During the four tumultuous years of the Civil War, 1861-1865, three men held the reins of government in Delaware. It was William Burton’s fate to be in the office of governor when secession was under consideration at the outset of the war. William Cannon won election replacing him to lead a divided state in 1862. And Gove Saulsbury ascended to the governor’s seat upon Cannon’s untimely death as the war ground to a halt.

A Sussex Countian by birth, Burton graduated from Pennsylvania Medical College in 1810 and practiced medicine in Lewes before moving to Milford. A former Whig, he joined the Democratic Party and ascended to the governorship in 1858.

Reed, McKay and Wade point out in “Delaware during the War Between the States” that Burton exhibited mixed views about the North-South divide — mirroring the attitude of many Delawareans. While ostensibly an anti-secessionist, he called for a convention to consider secession from the Union. However, the legislature failed to act on his request.

Burton appointed stalwart Unionist Henry duPont as a major-general of the state militia. When DuPont directed the arms of potential Confederate militia companies within the state be confiscated, however, Burton revoked his order. Despite this, military authorities disarmed Southern-leaning militias in Seaford, Laurel, Georgetown and elsewhere in the state.

Millsboro Country Festival becoming signature event

In just a few weeks, Millsboro’s annual Country Festival will return to the town, bringing with it music, activities, food and more. Organized by the Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce, the festival was designed to be a signature event for the town and its surrounding communities.

Burn Camp offers kids respite and fun

Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert : A carnival was held during Delaware Burn Camp’s week-long retreat at Camp Barnes. The kids were able to play games, eat cotton candy, enjoy a photobooth and, as camper Lincoln demonstrated, even make a little sand art.Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert : A carnival was held during Delaware Burn Camp’s week-long retreat at Camp Barnes. The kids were able to play games, eat cotton candy, enjoy a photobooth and, as camper Lincoln demonstrated, even make a little sand art.Sustaining any kind of burn can be extremely traumatic. In 2009, through state legislation the Delaware Burn Camp was created to provide a safe and natural environment for the promotion of physical and emotional healing to young victims of burn injuries.

Its mission is simple: “To assist young burn victims in their adjustment to injury through the provision of a safe, supportive environment and providing companionship through physical and social activities in a camp setting.”

This year, the camp was held at Camp Barnes near Bethany Beach on Aug. 11-16, and 10 campers were able to participate in various activities, including archery, crabbing and swimming.

“It’s a learning opportunity for them because they can realize that, ‘Yes, I was burned and have had a little bit of an issue. Maybe I’m a little handicapped. But I can still do anything I want to,’” said Joanne Hutchison, president of the camp.

yArt Sale takes center stage this weekend

A large private residence will resemble a European outdoor market this weekend, as the ninth annual “yArt” (Art in the Yard) show returns to Bethany Beach.

Nick and Julie Kypreos will open their gates at 33258 Kent Avenue on Aug. 30 and 31 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on both days.

It’s a free art show, but all raffle proceeds will go to the Bethany Beach Volunteer Fire Company.

Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral set for Labor Day Monday

Coastal Point • File Photo : Jazz Funeral participants mourn the death of summer in an end-of-summer celebration, held each year on the boardwalk, featuring jazz music and a mock funeral procession. This year will be the 29th year that the boardwalk has hosted this event.Coastal Point • File Photo : Jazz Funeral participants mourn the death of summer in an end-of-summer celebration, held each year on the boardwalk, featuring jazz music and a mock funeral procession. This year will be the 29th year that the boardwalk has hosted this event.For the 29th year, Bethany Beach will mark the unofficial end of the summer season with the Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral, this Labor Day Monday, and a silent auction Friday, Aug. 29, to benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters.

“For the past 29 summer seasons, the Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral has been held to celebrate the season’s end and to help the local residents ease back to the slower pace of off-season living,” said assistant chairperson Carolyn Bacon. “It is one last chance to celebrate the final moments of the summer season with an event that is marked by music, humor and good fellowship.”

Beginning at 5:30 p.m. on Monday at the north end of the Bethany Beach boardwalk, spectators can join in a funeral procession and enjoy the music of three jazz bands as they make their way down the boardwalk to the Bethany Beach bandstand.

“The Jazz Funeral has become a quirky Bethany Beach tradition, and all are welcomed to join in,” Bacon said. “Our goal is for every one of the 2,000 or more people who attend to enjoy themselves and to feel free to celebrate the end of the summer season in their own personal way.”

Dickens to host Simon’s ‘The Sunshine Boys’ from Sept. 4-7

For one weekend only, Sept. 4-7, the Dickens Parlour Theatre will host Neil Simon’s comedy “The Sunshine Boys,” which celebrates the best in classic sketch comedy, with beloved characters from the Vaudeville era.

An evening of conversation and performance will include a live reading featuring veteran performers Bob Fitch, Rich Bloch, David Kovac, Lisandra Tena and friends.

Civil War Profiles: The education of Quaker brothers in wartime

Albert Smith, treasurer of the Wilmington Savings Fund Society, and his wife, Elizabeth, lived with their six sons in the upper floors above the bank at the corner of Eighth and Market streets. They were Quakers and part of Wilmington’s old-line English aristocracy.

Public invited to enjoy Nanticoke history and culture at annual powwow

Coastal Point • File Photo : Charles Eagletail dances in the circle at the 2011 Nanticoke Indian Powwow near Millsboro.Coastal Point • File Photo : Charles Eagletail dances in the circle at the 2011 Nanticoke Indian Powwow near Millsboro.For 37 years, the Nanticoke Indian Association has been holding an annual powwow, welcoming the community to attend and learn about Nanticoke history.

“To the average layman, they would probably think of it as a festival. It’s actually a gathering of Native Americans exhibiting their wares, and dancing and singing,” explained Sterling Street, coordinator for the Nanticoke Indian Museum. “It’s a reuniting of Indian people while also exhibiting our culture to the public.”

This year, the powwow will be held on Sept. 6 and 7 at the powwow grounds east of Millsboro, near the museum.

The grounds will open at 10 a.m. on Sept. 6, with Grand Entry at noon. A second dance session will be held at 4 p.m., with the grounds closing for the day at 7 p.m. On Sept. 7, the Worship Service will begin at 10 a.m., with Grand Entry at 1 p.m. Dancing, storytelling and more will be held throughout that afternoon before the grounds close at 5 p.m.

Special Olympics athletes enjoy traditional summer camp

Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark : Annie Manista, a Project Unify partner with Special Olympics Delaware poses, with Ocean View resident Carol Bak, a Special Olympics athlete, after a kayaking trip. They were two of many who participated in the Special Olympics Delaware Summer Camp that took place at Camp Barnes earlier this month.Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark : Annie Manista, a Project Unify partner with Special Olympics Delaware poses, with Ocean View resident Carol Bak, a Special Olympics athlete, after a kayaking trip. They were two of many who participated in the Special Olympics Delaware Summer Camp that took place at Camp Barnes earlier this month.Special Olympics Delaware recently held its 14th annual Summer Camp at Camp Barnes. At the three-day camp, 54 athletes from all over the state attended to enjoy a classic summer camp, complete with archery, canoeing, crafts, sports and more.

“A lot of our Special Olympics athletes don’t get to go to a traditional [camp] — this is their opportunity,” said Jon Buzby, director of media relations for Special Olympics Delaware (SODE).

“That’s not to say that the local camp is going to turn away a child or adult with Down syndrome. But what we have here is counselors who are trained and educated on what they can do to make the experience the best possible for people with intellectual disabilities.”

SODE holds two sessions of camp each summer, each of which spans three days and two nights.