Arts & Entertainment

Art in the yard (yART) hits 10-year milestone in Bethany

Special to the Coastal Point • Christina Weaver: MERR Director Suzanne Thurman holds a cetacean skull outside the MERR building. The marine-animal rescue organization will be the beneficiary of this year’s yART sale.Special to the Coastal Point • Christina Weaver: MERR Director Suzanne Thurman holds a cetacean skull outside the MERR building. The marine-animal rescue organization will be the beneficiary of this year’s yART sale.This Labor Day weekend, Saturday and Sunday, marks the 10th anniversary of the annual yART sale at 33258 Kent Avenue in Bethany Beach. (yART = art in the yard!) There is no “rain date,” so fingers are crossed for fine weather.

The yART sale has become a win-win-win event. Artists win because they are able to display and sell their creations in an intimate and lovely setting, with the only requirement being a donation of one piece of their work.

The community wins by seeing and keeping up with the work of some of the area’s best artists of all media, and potters, jewelers and other artisans. And, most importantly, local non-profit organizations win from being beneficiaries of a “Chinese auction” of the artists’ donations, to the tune of more than $20,000 thus far.

The yART sale takes place in the circular driveway of the home of Julie and Nick Kypreos. The amount of time, effort, planning and generosity they devote to having successful events each year is somehow obscured by the seamless ease, fun and conviviality on the actual days of yART sale. And that includes when a sudden cloudburst erupts and everyone rushes around, focused on protecting theirs and others’ artwork from wind and rain.

“For me, the atmosphere of the event is the best part,’ said Julie Kypreos. “We always have a really great group of artists — some the same and a few different each year — who have forged a unique dynamic amongst themselves and with the public that faithfully returns. Everyone is always excited to see each other’s new pieces and perhaps new directions their art has taken them, and to check out the auction table to see the amazing donations.”

“The second best part is knowing that 100 percent of the money raised is going right back into worthy causes in our local community. I’m really happy that Suzanne Thurman and the MERR Institute is our charity this year.”

The MERR Institute is dedicated to the conservation of marine mammals and sea turtles and their habitat. MERR stands for Marine Education, Research & Rehabilitation. This year marks the 15th anniversary of its inception.

Civil War Profiles:

Robert McNamara commented in his essay “Why Were Flags So Important in the Civil War?” that these flags marked the position of the regiment on the battlefield. In the noise and smoke of battle, regiments could become scattered, and vocal commands, or even bugle calls, could not be heard.

Weeklong event celebrates Ellen Rice Gallery’s Bethany Beach grand opening

This Saturday kicks off a weeklong grand-opening celebration of the Ellen Rice Gallery’s move to Bethany Beach after “celebrating American creativity every day for 16 years” in Ocean View.

Casting call set for upcoming BART comedy production

Bethany Area Repertory Theater (BART) is inviting local drama buffs to try out for some of the group’s fall offerings. BART, which perform at the Dickens Theater at 3575 Atlantic Avenue in Millville, will begin the season’s first production, “Hate Mail,” in September, with performances on Sept. 17-19 and 24-26.

Jamboree Boys to play Bethany bandstand Saturday

How often do you get to see a state senator jam with his family and friends? Well, this weekend, locals and visitors will be able to enjoy music by the Jamboree Boys, featuring state Sen. Gerald Hocker on bass guitar.

Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra announces ‘Season of Celebration’

The 2015-2016 season of the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra (MSO) is designed to celebrate Maestro Julien Benichou’s 10 years as music director. The MSO’s 19th season will showcase a variety of music and soloists.

Boro Bash returning festival atmosphere to Millsboro next month

Coastal Point • File Photo: Above, the radio-controlled cars were a big hit at last year’s event.Coastal Point • File Photo: Above, the radio-controlled cars were a big hit at last year’s event.For the third year in a row, the Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce will host an annual festival — newly dubbed the “Boro Bash” this year.

“The committee felt, with all the bigger-name country music festivals that came into the area since the inception of our event, we were going to be kind of drowned out by that,” explained Executive Director Amy Simmons regarding the former moniker of Millsboro Country Festival. “We always knew we wanted a new name for it. And we thought, we have so many ’boros, with Dagsboro, Gumboro, Millsboro —we felt that fit the theme for a community family party.

“The entire premise for this whole festival was that it was something family-friendly, that it could be a multigenerational day spent with the whole family. Everything we do, we ask, is it family-friendly? Is it fun for everyone? And then we go from there.”

Gallery One artists say ‘Welcome to my World!’

Coastal Point • Submitted: Dale Sheldon’s ‘Autumn near Greve’ is an acrylic painting to be featured in Gallery One’s ‘Welcome to my World’ and will be held from Sept. 3-30.Coastal Point • Submitted: Dale Sheldon’s ‘Autumn near Greve’ is an acrylic painting to be featured in Gallery One’s ‘Welcome to my World’ and will be held from Sept. 3-30.Gallery One in Ocean View this week announced its September show theme, “Welcome to my World,” which will be open to the public Sept. 3-30. “Welcome to my world” is designed to be an invitation to glimpse and participate in realm of the Gallery One artists’ world. Each artist has a unique view, and each painting a different thought.

Dale Sheldon’s “Autumn Near Greve” glows with the “glorious colors seen in autumn in Tuscany, which are a feast for the eyes. The rich golds of the fields play against the cool hillsides in the distance, and the dramatic dark greens found in the trees complement the iconic red roofs.”

“View from my Garden” is the path Laura Hickman takes every day in her “summer world.” Watering the flowers and pool cleaning are never a chore. Sunlit grass and colorful flowers are so preferable to her “winter” world, she said.

Joyce Condry’s mixed-media painting “Waste Not Want Not” describes the evolutionary aspects of a painting. “I just can’t throw anything away! If a painting isn’t working, I might be able to make it work someday.”

Best of Milton Auction & Party set for Sept. 12

A celebration is planned for the 10th Annual Best of Milton Auction & Party on Saturday, Sept. 12, from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Milton Fire Hall, 116 Front Street in Milton. The party will aim for an atmosphere of cool elegance, in pale blue and shimmering silver as they celebrate this anniversary in style.

OC BikeFest and Delmarva Bike Week ready to rock Sept. 17-20

Delmarva Bike Week will celebrate its 15th anniversary Sept. 17-20 in three locations: Winterplace Park and the Shorebirds’ stadium in Salisbury, Md., and Rommel Harley-Davidson in Seaford.

Civil War Profiles: Yankee woman plus Rebel man equals inevitable friction

The Civil War brought about disruption and dislocation among family and friends in many ways. The outbreak of the conflict in 1861 forced people to declare allegiance to one side or the other. This often led to surprising and, at times, combative relationships.

First-ever state championship KCBS barbecue cook-off planned at state park

DNREC’s Division of Parks & Recreation will host the first-ever “Boo-B-Que By the Sea,” a two-day statewide barbecue cook-off competition beginning Friday, Oct. 30, at Delaware Seashore State Park. The event will also feature the first live auction for low-digit surf-fishing tags, on Saturday, Oct. 31.

Local music fans invited on a journey to ‘Hooverville’

Special to the Coastal Point • Christine Weaver  : Classic rock band Hooverville entertains the crowd at Brew River Restaurant & Bar in Salisbury, Md., on July 25. The band will be one of the acts performing during Locals Under the Lights at the Freeman Stage at Bayside on Thursday, Aug. 27.Special to the Coastal Point • Christine Weaver : Classic rock band Hooverville entertains the crowd at Brew River Restaurant & Bar in Salisbury, Md., on July 25. The band will be one of the acts performing during Locals Under the Lights at the Freeman Stage at Bayside on Thursday, Aug. 27.

“Hooverville is amazing,” said Bill Fitzgerald of Laurel. “A friend told us about this band playing at Brew River in Salisbury, and we came expecting to stay for a short while. We enjoyed them so much we stayed until they finished. I’ll definitely look out for them when they play again.”

Hooverville is a highly talented four-man classic rock band with a bluesy sound that came together about a year ago. While each musician is exceptional and experienced, what sets Hooverville apart is the quality of their individual voices and their two- and three-part harmonies.

“They sound great, and their beat is perfect for dancing,” said Pat Foskey who, along with two friends, was scouting for a new band to play at Moose Lodge 654 in Salisbury, Md. “We have a band every Friday night, and these guys play all of our rock ’n’ roll favorites. I hope we can get them to come.”

The guys in the band are James Marquardt, rhythm guitar and vocals; Danny Beck, lead guitar and vocals; Al “Big Al” Cook, bass and vocals; and John “Taco” Wroten on percussion.

Schonder honored for being a good ‘Friend’

Coastal Point • Submitted­­­: Chuck Schonder, center, recently received a Volunteer of the Year award from Gov. Jack Markell, left, and DNREC Secretary David Small.Coastal Point • Submitted­­­: Chuck Schonder, center, recently received a Volunteer of the Year award from Gov. Jack Markell, left, and DNREC Secretary David Small.

The grassroots effort to restore a local waterfront park is getting attention, as Charles “Chuck” Schonder recently received a state volunteer award for founding Friends of Holts Landing State Park.

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Control (DNREC) annually honors its vast network of unpaid helpers by naming Volunteers of the Year.

At the 2015 Delaware State Fair, Gov. Jack Markell and DNREC Secretary David Small presented awards in 10 categories, including Schonder’s winning category of Administration & Coordination.

“He is … a staunch promoter of volunteering, trail-day creator, scout recruiter and steering-committee member,” according to DNREC.

Other awards ranged from business partners to educators and friends groups (Trap Pond volunteers won the latter).

Delaware’s Samuel Boyer Davis: A near-death experience

In this modern age, spies caught in the act in the United States generally are sentenced to long prison terms. During the Civil War years, however, spies — real or suspected — almost always ended up at the end of rope.

Two of the most celebrated espionage cases in the mid-19th century conflict were that of Timothy Webster and Sam Davis. Webster was a secret agent in Richmond who was exposed while in the employ of the Northern spymaster Allen Pinkerton. Corey Recko described his life as a spy and death on the gallows in “A Spy for the Union.”

Davis was a member of the 1st Tennessee Infantry Regiment who volunteered for a newly-formed company of scouts and agents in the service of Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg. Federal forces captured him couriering documents that described Union battle plans. When Davis refused to divulge the name of his contact, he received a sentence of death by hanging, carried out on Nov. 27, 1863.

Teen musician takes to iTunes and YouTube

Elliot Rhoads is 17, a summer resident of the Bethany Beach area and a singer/songwriter.

‘Cluck, Pluck & Luck’ offers look at poultry industry

In 1923, Ocean View housewife Cecile Steele placed an order for 50 baby chicks, but ended up receiving 500. From that one mistake, the Delmarva poultry industry was born.

“Aside from Caesar Rodney riding up and Delaware voting for the Revolutionary War, this is probably the biggest, longest-lasting event that occurred in Delaware, as far as economic and cultural change,” said Ocean View Historical Society President Carol Psaros.

“The poultry industry has, to some extent, even outlasted the DuPont Company, which certainly was a big event — when the DuPonts immigrated here during the French Revolution.

Music, food and culture on tap Festival Hispano on Aug. 9

Coastal Point • File Photo : Festival Hispano brings the culture of many hispanic peoples to Millsboro.Coastal Point • File Photo : Festival Hispano brings the culture of many hispanic peoples to Millsboro.Festival Hispano is more than a colorful celebration of music, food and culture. Beyond the dozens of vendors and the crowds than can exceed 5,000 people, a dynamic develops: The event aims to bridge the past with the present, and the present with the future, and children and adults of all ages can connect with their heritage.

“We have children who pretty much grew up coming to the festival. This is an important part of their lives,” said Allison Burris Castellanos, a long-time event coordinator.

This year, Festival Hispano is being organized by La Esperanza community center in Georgetown. The event will be held from noon until 6 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 9, at the Little League Complex on State Street in Millsboro.

Perspectives on the Confederate flag controversy

The tragic death of nine African-Americans in Charleston, S.C., on June 17, at the hands of a person who featured himself online holding a Confederate flag, has triggered a groundswell of outrage about the killings and the flag itself. A vigorous movement is under way to rescind sanction for display of the flag on official property and end retail sales of products that display these flag symbols.

In response to questions posed by the publication Civil War News in its August 2015 issue, John M. Coski, a historian at the American Civil War Museum in Richmond, Va., elaborated on the flag issue. As author of “The Confederate Battle Flag: America’s Most Embattled Emblem,” he spoke with considerable expertise on the subject.

Coski explained that widespread display of the Confederate flag across America stems from permission given in years past by the U.S. government and the American people to white Southerners “to celebrate and perpetuate the Confederate cause and Confederate heroes; [but] it also testifies to … the exclusion of African-American Southerners from public life after Reconstruction.”

In the years following the Civil War, black voices were raised in protest to the public display of the Confederate flag at such events as the dedication of the Robert E. Lee memorial in Richmond. By the mid-20th century, the flags became “pop culture symbols of ‘rebellion’ and as symbols of segregation and white supremacy.”

This is when a line was drawn between those who misused the flag for political or commercial purposes, and those who defended the flag on the basis of Confederate heritage. Coski stated that the latter group “spearheaded a wave of state laws prohibiting and punishing such acts.”

BART to take the stage at Dickens Parlour Theatre

Coastal Point • File Photo : Cast members of last year’s BART program perform on stage at Dickens Parlour Theatre in Millville.Coastal Point • File Photo : Cast members of last year’s BART program perform on stage at Dickens Parlour Theatre in Millville.

For its 2015-2016 season, the Bethany Area Repertory Theater (BART) plans to feature six comedies to bring entertainment and laughs to the masses.

“Each year we have increased the shows,” said Bob Davis, who founded the organization in 2012. “This year, we have six full theatrical productions, and we’re ending it with a very ambitious project — our first full-scale musical — ‘A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.’ … We thought we’d try to have a season that has a little bit of everything.

“This is entertainment that you can come to and have a good time.”

BART performs annually at Dickens Parlour Theatre, with tickets costing $25 per person per show. To kick off the season, Sept. 17-19 and 24-26, BART will feature “Hate Mail,” a play by Bill Corbett and Kira Obolensky.