Arts & Entertainment

The face and voice of Delmarva news

John B. Greenberger was ‘Delmarva’s Walter Cronkite’

Special to the Coastal Point • Christina Weaver: Bruce Mears holds a newspaper article about his grandfather, John B. Greenberger.Special to the Coastal Point • Christina Weaver: Bruce Mears holds a newspaper article about his grandfather, John B. Greenberger.“This is the 7 p.m. edition, WBOC-TV News, and once again I say, ‘I am John B. Greenberger. It’s a good evening.’”

Lifelong local residents may recognize that sign-off as the one they heard every evening until 1975 when families congregated around their television to watch Delmarva and then national TV news. Greenberger was the local voice and face of Delmarva news from 1940 on the radio and subsequently from 1954 on both radio and television.

“Walter Cronkite followed my grandfather on CBS every evening,” said Millville’s Bruce Mears. “In fact, they resembled each other and had the same perfectly enunciated tone of voice. Around here, he was known as ‘Delmarva’s Walter Cronkite’ and was quite the local celebrity.”

John Massey, 93 and a regular visitor at the Roxana Cheer Center, was asked, out of the blue, about John B.:

IR Live! presents a musical of the decades

Live music is a hallmark of Indian River High School productions, and the students are ready to impress once again.

This year’s musical revue is IR Live! presents “The Corner Club on Baker Street,” featuring an original script by music director Nathan Mohler and student T.J. Oxbrough.

Performances are Friday and Saturday, March 24 and 25, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $5 per person.

April 2 ‘Dancert’ to benefit local musician with cancer

Lovestock: a Cancer Benefit “Dancert” for John “Taco” Wroten, drummer of the local classic-rock band Hooverville, will be held Sunday, April 2, from 2 to 8 p.m. at American Legion Post 2 in Dover.

Wroten, 62, was recently diagnosed with Stage 4 tongue cancer and is currently receiving treatment, which is limiting his ability to perform with the band and at his full-time job.

Freeman Stage at Bayside announces 2017 lineup

Celebrating its 10th season bringing arts to Sussex County, the Freeman Stage at Bayside is promising to continue doing just that, and in grand style, as it announced on March 15 its summer season lineup.

What is... Delaware?

‘Jeopardy’-style trivia hitting Millsboro library

“You think you know, but you have no idea.”

While local history-hounds won’t have to phrase any answers in the form of a question, there’ll be plenty of them asked when Elkton, Md.-based storyteller Ed Okonowicz appears at the Millsboro Pubic Library for “So You Think You Know All about Delaware?” on Monday, March 20.

Local author aims to thrill readers in ‘Third Haven’

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Selbyville author B.B. Shamp smiles with her new novel ‘Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit’ at a book signing at Energy Gym.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Selbyville author B.B. Shamp smiles with her new novel ‘Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit’ at a book signing at Energy Gym.After an explosion shakes the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, a woman escapes to the Eastern Shore with her young son. She spends the next 280 pages figuring out what’s happening and why an unnamed evil is following her.

Local author B.B. Shamp used bits of her own traumatic — but slightly less dramatic — experiences to inform her new book, “Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit.”

In 2008, Shamp fell off a ladder in her D.C. home. In the hospital with a broken back, she suffered a massive pulmonary embolism, then major organ failure. Doctors induced a coma, but Shamp still faced a near-death experience and saw the fabled white light.

That could be a lot to carry when a person wakes up and must re-learn how to walk and speak, hampered by PTSD and a traumatic brain injury.

Over four years, she used “Third Haven” as a map to help understand herself and bury breadcrumbs of trauma and intrigue for readers to follow that journey.

The novel’s initial explosion shakes the main character, Claire, from her everyday frustrations and tosses her into a rollicking plot that pushes her from Maryland’s Eastern Shore to coastal Delaware.

“The plot is engaging … and there are a lot of clues as to who the antagonist is,” Shamp said.

New stage on the way

Revamped Freeman stage unveils 10th-season lineup March 15

The daffodils are up, the robins have returned, the beach communities are stretching, yawning and coming back to life. Spring is right around the corner, and summer will be here before we know it. As winter ends and the sun begins to warm the sand and the fields again, there is a question crackling through offices and gyms and supermarkets...

Who’s coming to the Freeman Stage this year?

Millsboro Chamber hosting annual bridal show this Sunday

The Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce has couples-to-be covered this weekend, as the Chamber will host the 22nd Annual Central Sussex Bridal Show this Sunday, March 12, from noon to 3 p.m. at Cripple Creek Golf & Country Club.

“Every year, we see more vendors, new vendors who have never been in,” said Amy Simmons, the Chamber’s executive director.

Celtic music to fill library ahead of St. Patrick’s Day

Those looking for a way to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day next week can head to the South Coastal Library on March 14.

Melissa Heieie and Susan Ryan, a duo known as Willow Tree, will give a Celtic music concert that Tuesday at 2 p.m. in meeting rooms A and B.

Poker & Fun Car Rallye to benefit Justin’s Beach House

When the Poker & Fun Car Rallye V cruises out of the parking lot at Hooked Up in Millville on Saturday, March 4, drivers and their co-pilots will be armed with directions and a list of questions — and the knowledge that their trek is for a really good cause.

Anteater handbags on the red carpet?

Local entrepreneur adds anteaters to swag bags for glitzy event

Coastal Point • Submitted by Delaware Public Archives : Devon Cooper, dance instructor at X-Squad Dance Studio in Selbyville, models one of the newest handbags in the collection of Jules K. The locally-owned company sent 26 handbags to be included in ‘swag bags’ offered to Oscar nominees by a promotional firm.Coastal Point • Submitted by Delaware Public Archives : Devon Cooper, dance instructor at X-Squad Dance Studio in Selbyville, models one of the newest handbags in the collection of Jules K. The locally-owned company sent 26 handbags to be included in ‘swag bags’ offered to Oscar nominees by a promotional firm.What do anteaters and actresses have in common? The answer involves handbags, swag, a local woman’s childhood love of a certain insect-eating mammal, and a big night in Hollywood.

Ten actresses, in particular — the ones who will be vying for the Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress statuettes at Sunday’s Academy Awards in Hollywood — will receive handbags imprinted with an anteater pattern.

The bags, produced by Bethany Beach resident Julie Kypreos’ company, Jules K., are part of “Everyone Wins” promotional “swag bags” provided to Oscar nominees by the promotional company Distinctive Assets.

Through the Distinctive Assets promotion, packages of “swag” are delivered to the homes of nominees for Best Actress, Best Actor, Supporting Actress and Supporting Actor, as well as Best Director nominees and host Jimmy Kimmel.

Kypreos, whose handbags are sold online, said she came up with the idea of submitting her handbags for consideration while researching ways to get the word out about her unique handbags.

“I’m a start-up,” she said, adding that she recognizes that her handbags are so unique that they require some creative marketing. “No one is probably going to do a Google search for ‘anteater handbags,’” she said with a bit of a chuckle.

The swag bags include gifts for the nominees that range from a tube of ChapStick to a three-day stay at an 18-bedroom beachfront mansion in northern California, valued at $40,000. Kypreos’ handbags range in price from $370 to $395.

While all of the nominees for Best Director are men and, obviously, the 10 Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor nominees are men, they — as well as Kimmel — will also receive Jules K. bags. Kypreos said she tried to take the men’s significant others into consideration when choosing which bag to contribute for them, when applicable.

From Richard Allen history, a new sense of culture and community

Coastal Point • Submitted by Delaware Public Archives : A historical photo shows the Richard Allen School in 1923.Coastal Point • Submitted by Delaware Public Archives : A historical photo shows the Richard Allen School in 1923.Grade-school memories follow people through life, for better or worse. And, although the old Richard Allen School was born of segregation, people are being inspired today to transform it into a community and cultural center in Georgetown.

“When Richard Allen opened its door [in the 1920s], it was a beacon of hope for African-Americans living in Sussex County,” according to the Richard Allen Coalition. “When it reopens next year, it will welcome all of us who want to learn about the past while helping our youth explore their talents and prepare for a wonderful future.”

The non-profit Richard Allen Coalition wants to restore the school’s legacy as an educational and community center. Physically, the old building won’t just become a museum to freeze history, but a community center to breathe life into the town.

A ‘Night to Shine’

Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: Ocean View Church of Christ played host to Night to Shine, a program for special-needs people 14 and older. The program was put on by the Tim Tebow Foundation and held in churches around the world on Friday, Feb. 10.Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: Ocean View Church of Christ played host to Night to Shine, a program for special-needs people 14 and older. The program was put on by the Tim Tebow Foundation and held in churches around the world on Friday, Feb. 10.Last weekend, guys and gals walked the red carpet while paparazzi flashbulbs popped. It wasn’t the Academy Awards, but it was certainly a night to shine at the Ocean View Church of Christ.

Night to Shine is a program that is sponsored by the Tim Tebow Foundation, to provide an “unforgettable prom-night experience, centered on God’s love, for people with special needs ages 14 and older.”

“The church always talks about the sanctity of life, which simply means we value all life,” said the Rev. Gregg Wilgus of the Ocean View Church of Christ. “More times than not [those with special needs] are left out. It’s just meant to show those with special needs that they are loved and cared for as well.

“The truth of it is, it’s for anyone who is mentally or physically handicapped. We have 14-year-old registered, and we have a 60-year-old registered. Most of them are in their late 20s and early 30s.”

Tech comes home for the holidays

While it wasn’t my intention, I had a tech-heavy 2016 holiday season, dealing with a number of new devices and systems, despite having aimed for a relatively simple, scaled-back holiday.

Counting on kindness at Showell Elementary

PCS students wear their kindness proudly

Coastal Point • Submitted: Birannah Stevens, Ella Peterson and Edgard Chavez-Hernandez check out the bead supply while making kindness bracelets at Phillip C. Showell Elementary School.Coastal Point • Submitted: Birannah Stevens, Ella Peterson and Edgard Chavez-Hernandez check out the bead supply while making kindness bracelets at Phillip C. Showell Elementary School.Kindness can be like a rock in water. One good deed can ripple outward to distant shores.

Phillip C. Showell Elementary School celebrated January as Kindness Month by encouraging children to be kind and witness kindness in their lives.

With handmade Kindness Bracelets, students can now count and remember random acts of kindness each day.

“As they witness, give or receive an act of kindness through the day, they’ll move a charm,” said Laurie Hall, teacher of art and special education at the school. Hopefully, later, at home, “they talk about what they’ve done to move them.”

The bracelets are threaded so that people can slide the 10 beads deliberately, without them slipping backward again.

Not just tragic lovers: IRHS shows humor, flaws of 'Romeo and Juliet'

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Cast members of Indian River High School’s ‘Romeo & Juliet’ prepare for performances on Feb. 3 and 4. In producing what may be the school’s first drama production in decades, they dropped some of the dialogue and put a modern spin on the classic.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Cast members of Indian River High School’s ‘Romeo & Juliet’ prepare for performances on Feb. 3 and 4. In producing what may be the school’s first drama production in decades, they dropped some of the dialogue and put a modern spin on the classic.It’s either the most famous romance of all time, or the silliest. A love story between two teenagers, ages 14 and 17, “Romeo & Juliet” now has modern-day teenagers calling out their literary counterparts out for being a bit overdramatic. And Indian River High School’s new Drama Club is plunging in with its first full production, taking on William Shakespeare’s classic romantic tragedy.

To top it all off, “Romeo & Juliet,” coming at 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 3 and 4, may be the first drama production at IRHS in decades. Tickets cost $5 each. Guests can bring extra money for the concession stand at intermission. Indian River High School is located at 29772 Armory Road, Dagsboro.

It’s time for IR’s “hidden talent” to display their acting skills, said English teacher and director Sadie Andros.

Catherine’s Quilting offers modern finish for age-old art form

Coastal Point photos • Tyler Valliant: Catherine Peterson grins at her family's new Selbyville quilt shop, where she helps finish new quilts and restore old ones.Coastal Point photos • Tyler Valliant: Catherine Peterson grins at her family's new Selbyville quilt shop, where she helps finish new quilts and restore old ones.Quilting may be an old art, but Catherine’s Quilting uses technology to transform the basic craft into a finished heirloom piece. Catherine and Tim Peterson just recently opened their quilt shop on Church Street in downtown Selbyville.

Quilting can be a very personal craft, whether it’s a long-term labor of love by a group of friends, or maybe one woman, perhaps given for a wedding or baby gift. Whether hand-stitched in centuries past, or by a machine today, each scrap is carefully pieced together for a grander masterpiece.

Catherine’s Quilting helps with the final steps, attaching the thick batting, which transforms a decorative sheet into a cozy blanket for the home.

Selbyville fair is ‘Just for the Health of It!’

Let’s get this new year started right!

That’s the message behind Selbyville Public Library’s upcoming health fair, Just for the Health of It! Scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 14, the event will run like an open house or trade fair. The public can come and go, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Birding weekend for all nature lovers

Monthly birding events highlight area wildlife

For the people who love hearing a great horned owl hoot eerily at dusk, or watching a great blue heron chow down on an unlucky fish: Humans and birds are flying toward the Delmarva Peninsula for the same reason — the winter migration.

Winter is a busy season for birdfeeding aficionados

Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: A cardinal sits at a bird feeder in Camden-Wyoming.Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: A cardinal sits at a bird feeder in Camden-Wyoming.The other day, my 3-year-old grandson, Samuel, and I were filling our birdfeeders when my son-in-law asked if we really expected birds to come use them at this time of the year. At first I thought, why ask such a silly question? But after I thought a little bit about it, I realized that it wasn’t such a silly question.

Many people remember being taught that birds fly south for the winter. Also, if you don’t have birdfeeders up, you will see fewer birds during the winter months. However, if you have birdfeeders up and keep them cleaned and filled, you will have lots of birds visiting your yard.

Many birds eat bugs and, at this time of year, many bugs go into dormant states. Other birds eat seeds, and plants also go into dormant states at this time of year, resulting in less seeds for the birds to eat.

Delicious and nutritious eating a goal for 2017

Special to the Coastal Point • Marie Cook: Sue Steel and Erik Schreiber are fitness professionals at Custom Fit 360 in Millville. Schreiber shared his healthy recipes with Marie.Special to the Coastal Point • Marie Cook: Sue Steel and Erik Schreiber are fitness professionals at Custom Fit 360 in Millville. Schreiber shared his healthy recipes with Marie.Here we are again — another New Year! As we say hello to 2017, I’m reminded of one of the songs my husband, Jim, occasionally sings on karaoke nights — “Choices,” as sung by the late, great country singer George Jones. The opening lyrics are: “I’ve had choices since the day that I was born. There were voices that told me right from wrong. If I had listened, no, I wouldn’t be here today, living and dying with the choices I’ve made.”

It has been my tradition at the beginning of each year to write a healthy-cooking and fitness column. We all know the New Year drill. It’s about “choices.” Do I make New Year’s resolutions? Do I set goals for myself? Will this be the year that I finally _____________ (you fill in the blank)? And if I make resolutions, will this be the year that I actually succeed in keeping them?

In December 2015, I again began chemo treatments to deal with the return of my rare form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in both lungs. Treatments ended in April, and I’m thrilled that I am again in remission — eight months and counting.

Fenwick Island ready to bring the ‘Freeze’ to the shore

Coastal Point • File Photo: The Fenwick Freeze creates a splash.Coastal Point • File Photo: The Fenwick Freeze creates a splash.Good news, Fenwick Freeze fans! This year’s freeze — technically a dip in ocean waters whose temperatures are hovering in the mid-40s — will be 90 minutes later.

That means New Year’s revelers will have a bit longer to drink some coffee and pull their swimsuits out of the bottom of their dressers. This year’s swim will be held at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 1. Swimmers will gather on the beach at Bayard Street, according to Rebecca McWilliams, chairman of the town’s Beach Committee.

McWilliams, who has organized the swim since its inception 13 years ago, said although Fenwick’s winter swim might not be as big as those in neighboring beach towns, its charm lies in its simplicity “It’s kind of a local thing,”she said. “It’s the same people that do it every year.” McWilliams said many of the 150 or so swimmers have participated with their families since the very first one.

Hair of the Dog/Exercise like the Eskimos set for New Years Day

Coastal Point photos • File photo: The start to a previous Exercise Like the Eskimos event. Coastal Point photos • File photo: The start to a previous Exercise Like the Eskimos event. For the sixth straight year, local residents can ring in the New Year with the Hair of the Dog 5K/10K, and for the 21st year in a row, they can follow it up with the Leo Brady Exercise like the Eskimos Plunge into the Atlantic Ocean.

The downtown Bethany Beach-based event is set to get underway on Sunday, Jan. 1, with the race starting off at Parkwood Street and Atlantic Avenue, and ending at the Bethany Beach Bandstand.

Hundreds of runners from all age groups and experience levels are expected, to compete on the family friendly and “festive” course.

The first 350 runners to complete the race will receive official finishing medals to go along with both overall and age group awards.

Author Ryan wins Gettysburg Civil War Roundtable Book Award

Local author and Coastal Point columnist Thomas J. Ryan was recently named the winner of the annual Gettysburg Civil War Roundtable Book Award for his book “Spies, Scouts & Secrets in the Gettysburg Campaign,” published by Savas Beatie of California.

Fundraiser aims to help family of local fifth-grader

When a routine eye exam Nov. 3 led to the discovery of a golf-ball-sized tumor, the life of a local fifth-grader and his family was immediately and drastically turned upside down.

‘It’s the classical “Cinderella” with a twist’

SCHS presents classic show, plus children’s party

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: The magic of ‘Cinderella’ is coming to Sussex Central High School. Here, part of the cast pause for a picture while rehearsing the pumpkin transformation.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: The magic of ‘Cinderella’ is coming to Sussex Central High School. Here, part of the cast pause for a picture while rehearsing the pumpkin transformation.Rodgers’ and Hammerstein’s classic fairytale story is coming to the stage at Sussex Central High School, as, for one weekend, the SCHS Take Two Drama Club will present “Cinderella.”

The show will be Friday and Saturday, Dec. 16 and 17, at 7 p.m., with a Saturday matinee at 2 p.m.

“The classic fairytale has been turned into a moving, funny and magical story with a great score and a beautiful message about making your own pathway in life,” according to David Warick, director and SCHS drama instructor.

General admission costs $8 at the door. Students, seniors and military pay $5. Middle school students with ID are admitted on a special two-for-one ticket for $5. No one will be turned away for inability to pay. The box office opens at 1 p.m. for the matinee and 5:30 p.m. for the evening performances.

Organizers break ground on groundbreaking garden

Coastal Point Photos • Laura Walter: It’s not really a ground-breaking event without dignitaries, officials and volunteers chipping in to get things started, and things got started in a major fashion at the Delaware Botanic Gardens at Pepper Creek.Coastal Point Photos • Laura Walter: It’s not really a ground-breaking event without dignitaries, officials and volunteers chipping in to get things started, and things got started in a major fashion at the Delaware Botanic Gardens at Pepper Creek.It all started in 2011 with a small cocktail party and a meeting at the library. Now, the governor and Delaware’s First Lady are attending groundbreakings and the endowment is growing for the Delaware Botanic Gardens at Pepper Creek.

On the cool, sunny morning of Dec. 1, most of the leaves had fallen in Dagsboro, obscuring the ground where flowers will reappear next spring, and where miles of green briar have already been heaved out.

“The Delaware Botanic Gardens at Pepper Creek will be a world-class, inspirational, educational and sustainable public botanic garden in southern Delaware, created for the benefit and enjoyment of all,” their mission promises.

School concerts offering holiday music to community

Children across the land have been preparing for the upcoming slate of holiday concerts almost as diligently as they’ve worked on their lists for Santa. Horns are tooting, drummers are drumming and singers are tuning their pipes in anticipation of the chance to shine in front of their families and friends and spread some holiday cheer while they’re at it.

Ocean View to celebrate season at the park

Aiming to spread holiday cheer, the Town of Ocean View will be holding its annual Holiday in the Park this weekend. The public is being invited to join in the festivities at John West Park on Saturday, Dec. 10, from 3 to 5 p.m.

Nativity Festival to showcase the heart of Christmas

Coastal Point • File Photo: A stained glass nativity set catches the light from a window during a past festival.Coastal Point • File Photo: A stained glass nativity set catches the light from a window during a past festival.Away in a manger,
no crib for a bed,

The little Lord Jesus
laid down his sweet head,

The stars in the bright sky
looked down where he lay,

The little Lord Jesus
asleep on the hay.

Next weekend, the Ocean View Presbyterian Church will open its doors for its annual Nativity Festival — inviting the public to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ.

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