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Time for the talk: Expert says discuss sea level now, or lose land later

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Kenneth Kristl discusses sea level rise at a workshop held at the Inland Bays Foundation in Bethany Beach.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Kenneth Kristl discusses sea level rise at a workshop held at the Inland Bays Foundation in Bethany Beach.Delaware’s sea and the land it surrounds could change shape by the year 2100, which means now it the time to discuss legal ramifications. Law professor Kenneth Kristl led a workshop last week as part of an effort to start public conversation on how Delaware could develop a comprehensive sea-level rise strategy. The Inland Bays Foundation hosted him May 15 in Bethany Beach.

“The citizens of Delaware have to start thinking: Where do we want to put our effort? How do we want to spend our money?” Kristl said. “This is enormously complex and, yet, it has practical consequences for anybody that’s living along the coast.”

Kristl and students authored the report “Assessing the Legal Toolbox for Sea Level Rise Adaptation in Delaware: Options and Challenges for Regulators, Policymakers, Property Owners and the Public.”

“It is a roadmap for how to confront some of the obstacles that exist in … sea-level rise adaptation.”

The book doesn’t recommend “Tool A” instead of Tool B,” but lays out the facts of existing policies and challenges. Kristl received a grant to write the 188-page report, begin public outreach and start the public conversation.

First, Kristl emphasized, sea-level rise is happening even if people don’t believe in overall climate change.

IR students climb STEM to architecture and engineering

Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark: Joseph Ciriello presents a real toy car and the 3D computer model at Indian River's STEM class.Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark: Joseph Ciriello presents a real toy car and the 3D computer model at Indian River's STEM class.Many of today’s K-12 students are preparing for jobs that don’t even exist yet. As technology catapults forward, Indian River High School is pulling the lever with a pre-engineering pathway for STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics).

Only two years old, the four-year STEM pathway is aimed at preparing students for a new level of technology and design in their college and careers.

“I like creating things,” said freshman Joseph Ciriello, who joined STEM after being inspired by a family friend who works in mechanical engineering. In the design-heavy course Introduction to Engineering Design, he’s ready to start building, but the students are first learning the computer programs that will propel them to the next step.

Long Neck counselor loves students, community service

Cathy Besden-Showell has more than 700 students at Long Neck Elementary School, but she aims to make a difference where it’s really needed.

“You have the opportunity to impact the students’ lives. I’m sure you don’t impact them all, but … some, you do make a difference,” she said.

Comolli brings passion to teaching at Indian River High

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Indian River High School’s Diane Comolli recently earned Teacher of the?Year at IRHS. Comolli compared winning the honor to an Oscar of the teaching world.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Indian River High School’s Diane Comolli recently earned Teacher of the?Year at IRHS. Comolli compared winning the honor to an Oscar of the teaching world.When Principal Bennett Murray tried to congratulate Diane Comolli for winning Teacher of the Year at Indian River High School, he couldn’t actually reach her. Students were eagerly swarming the English teacher’s classroom.

“I went down there to congratulate her after I had made the announcement via the PA system. I couldn’t get to her because her students were congratulating her and giving her hugs. Her kids were just as proud of her as we were,” Murray said. “I thought that spoke volumes that the students took time out of their schedules to congratulate her.”

“I was overwhelmed,” she said. “There are such fabulous teachers in this building. Just to be considered … is an honor. I guess, if you’re a teacher, that’s an Oscar!”

“I was so glad and honored to represent what is good about this building,” she said. “Indian River demonstrates each day what’s good about public schools.”

Teaching 10th-grade English, she sees students of all abilities, and she wouldn’t have it any other way.

“I have a passion for all kids. They all deserve to learn. They all can learn, no matter what circumstances they come from,” said Comolli, adding that she feels she can approach multiple needs and learning styles.

“I got that from advertising. I talk to my audience in a way they’ll listen. … In high school, that’s especially important,” she said.

Progress for Prostate to hold 11th annual golf tournament

In the last decade, one local fundraiser has raised nearly a quarter of a million dollars to help fight prostate cancer. Progress for Prostate was created in 2004 by Bethany Beach resident Bob Davis after conquering his own battle with prostate cancer.

IR lax seniors graduate as program pioneers

Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark: Indian River High School senior lacrosse players pose for a photo with their families. These players pioneered the lacrosse program at the high school and leave behind a solid legacy to follow.Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark: Indian River High School senior lacrosse players pose for a photo with their families. These players pioneered the lacrosse program at the high school and leave behind a solid legacy to follow.Delaware — and especially southern Delaware — aren’t exactly known as a lacrosse hotbed. While some longer-tenured programs, including Cape Henlopen, are certainly ahead of the First State curve, they are still a long way off from being able to compete with teams on the other side of the bridge.

And Indian River High School Head Lacrosse Coach Jim Dietz is well aware of the vastly different levels of competition in the increasingly popular sport, across the nation, and has taken steps to develop it locally — most notably by starting the area’s first youth program, Tribe Lacrosse.

The feeder system will, of course, take years to benefit the high school program, but Dietz has already been successful in developing the mostly inexperienced players that he coaches right now. Impressively, the longtime coach was able to take the athletes among this year’s senior class from a bunch of football players — most of whom had never even picked up a stick — to Indian River’s first-ever playoff-caliber lacrosse team.

Lady Indians find swing in 7-1 playoff win at Padua

The No. 12 Lady Indians snuck into the DIAA softball playoffs last week, with senior pitcher Rachel Hudson stepping up on the mound and behind the bats of a few of their key hitters. The entire team was back in rhythm at the plate last Saturday, May 24, when they traveled to No.

Brittingham named Henlopen Conference Coach of the Year

Coastal Point • Tripp Colonell: Indian River Softball Head Coach Erika Brittingham was recently named the Henlopen Conference Coach of the Year.Coastal Point • Tripp Colonell: Indian River Softball Head Coach Erika Brittingham was recently named the Henlopen Conference Coach of the Year.Erika Brittingham has been named All-Conference in the Henlopen as a pitcher for Sussex Central High School. She’s been named All-State, and even All-American, pitching for Salisbury University at the collegiate level.

However, in just her first year leading the Indian River High School softball team, Brittingham has been awarded conference honors for the first time, without taking the mound — recently being named the Henlopen Conference Coach of the Year.

“It’s a good honor, because it’s from the other coaches,” Brittingham said of the recognition. “It was nice for our coaching staff, because I don’t feel as [the award] is just mine. Abbi [Buchler] and Katherine [Bennett] put in just as much work as I do, and it’s well-deserved.”

Dunes Pink Classic back to benefit DBCC

Special to the Coastal Point • Mike McGown: Dunes Pink Classic participants pose for a photo during last year’s event at Bear Trap Dunes.Special to the Coastal Point • Mike McGown: Dunes Pink Classic participants pose for a photo during last year’s event at Bear Trap Dunes.The Dunes Pink Classic will return to Bear Trap Dunes next Monday, June 2, for the eighth annual golf tournament benefitting the Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition.

This year’s tournament will kick off with a “Pink Party” on Saturday, May 31, from 6:30 to 10 p.m. at Bear Trap, where attendees will wear pink and enjoy a D.J., appetizers, shot bar, games, prizes and both silent and live auctions.

‘Simon Shreds’: The future is now for one of Delmarva’s premiere surfing talents

Special to the Coastal Point • Chris Monroe: Simon Hetrick looks for some shade from the California sun on his recent trip to the West Coast to compete in the Volcom VCS.Special to the Coastal Point • Chris Monroe: Simon Hetrick looks for some shade from the California sun on his recent trip to the West Coast to compete in the Volcom VCS.Local surfing phenom Simon Hetrick has seven sponsors. He’s been on the ESA All-Star team for two years and has been a captain for one. He typically keeps a six- or seven-board quiver and has surfed in nine different states, two different countries and one United States territory. And, recently, at ESA Mid-Atlantic Regionals in Folly Beach, S.C., he won two events - one in the Boys Shortboard and one in the Menehune Bodyboard - and the sportsmanship award.

Considering all those numbers, perhaps the most shocking one is his age — 13 — and the fact that, not only does he already know what he’s supposed to do with his life, he’s already doing it.

“My ultimate goal in surfing would either be to travel the world free-surfing and making movies, or to win a world title,” said Hetrick of his aspirations. “It would be amazing in general to make a living out of what I love to do.”

Hetrick’s victory at regionals was more than enough to qualify him for ESA Easterns, which will be held in Nagshead, N.C., this fall — but facing small surf, he said, wave selection at Folly was key in differentiating his first-place finish.

Shorebirds sweeping/streaking in home series

The Delmarva Shorebirds have been rolling since their return home last Wednesday, May 22, pulling off a series sweep against Kannapolis convincingly and well on their way to doing the same against Hagerstown to cap off an eight-game home series.

TRAFFIC ALERT: DelDOT announces Route 26 roadwork for May 27 to 30

Night work continues on the State Route 26 Mainline Improvement Project between Clarksville and Ocean View. There may be lane closures overnight from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m., Tuesday night to Friday morning:

• at the Old Mill Road intersection (by Food Lion).
• between Old Mill Road and Grants Avenue to install a new drainage system.

Bethany Streetscape and Route 26 project cleared for season

Local drivers have gotten used to seeing orange traffic cones this winter, but the days are getting longer, so the lane closures are getting shorter.

County proposes $117.3M budget for 2015 fiscal year

The Sussex County Council this week reviewed the County’s proposed $117.3 million budget for the 2015 fiscal year. The proposed budget is down by $400,000, nearly .3 percent, from the current year’s $117.7 million budget.

Citizens voice dismay over county councilmen’s comments

Earlier this week, more than half-dozen citizens spoke to the Sussex County Council, voicing their displeasure over the comments made last week by Councilmen Vance Phillips and Sam Wilson regarding the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

IR board OKs Ennis improvements, tables new middle school

The Indian River School District Board of Education this week dusted off a conversation it began two years ago: considering a new middle school.

Bodies in suspected murder-suicide discovered near Selbyville

Delaware State Police this week were investigating a suspected murder-suicide after the bodies of a Maryland couple were discovered in Bayview Estates, in an unincorporated area of Sussex County near Selbyville.

Hocker, Gray hear need for waterway maintenance tax

With the federal government backing away from waterway maintenance, state Sen. Gerald Hocker (R-20th) and state Rep. Ron Gray (R-38th) have recently received hundreds of calls and emails about related issues.

CoCHILLa to feature local musicians’ work

This weekend, residents and visitors alike will have the opportunity to sample the talents of some of the area’s singers and songwriters at a unique free event, when the Big Chill Surf Cantina in Rehoboth Beach will host the second CoCHILLa event, on Sunday, May 25, at 4:30 p.m., organized by local musician Melissa Alesi.

Lewes farmers’ market to feature Kindle chef

The Historic Lewes Farmers Market (HLFM) will celebrate Memorial Day weekend and the arrival of the summer season on May 24 from 8 a.m. to noon on the grounds of the Lewes Historical Society at 110 Shipcarpenter Street, at the corner of West Third and Shipcarpenter Streets in Lewes.

Keep those who have fallen in mind this weekend

All too often, particularly in our little slice of Heaven by the shore, the meaning of Memorial Day gets lost in the shuffle.

Festival Hispano to celebrate 20 years in Sussex County

Festival Hispano will be held on Sunday, Aug. 10, from noon to 6 p.m., at the Millsboro Little League Complex on State Street in Millsboro. El Centro Cultural will be celebrating the 20th year of Festival Hispano in Sussex County.

Civil War Profiles: A post-war lynching in Delaware

The end of the Civil War did not bring a complete halt to the massive loss of life that took place during four years of conflict. Animosity between the races frequently led to unbridled mob rule and lynching of African-Americans, as well as whites who sympathized with their plight.

Beebe Walk-In Care reopens Memorial Day weekend in Millville

On Memorial Day weekend, Beebe Healthcare will reopen its Walk-In Care in Millville for visitors and residents whose primary-care physicians are unavailable. Walk-in Care will be open daily, seven days a week, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., throughout the summer season.

The Walk-In hours during September will be posted before Labor Day weekend.

No appointments are necessary.

Get to know the talent at the 2014 Artisans Fair

Coastal Point • Submitted: Above, Marcia Cupschalk returns to this year’s Artisans Fair, to be held at the Lord Baltimore Elementary School. Cupschalk creates fine art and jewelry and is known for her kumihimo braiding used in her jewelry.Coastal Point • Submitted: Above, Marcia Cupschalk returns to this year’s Artisans Fair, to be held at the Lord Baltimore Elementary School. Cupschalk creates fine art and jewelry and is known for her kumihimo braiding used in her jewelry.Growing in popularity each year, the 2014 Artisans Fair promises to be the biggest and best to date, with an array of artisan talent from across the area. This year’s fair will feature everything from traditional artists to beekeepers making useful products out of their own honey, so before shoppers head to the show this weekend, here are a few highlights from some faces that they’re sure to see.

Janice Itzel — fiber artist

Itzel graduated college with a degree in both teaching and art. After teaching middle school from 1984 to 2009, she retired from teaching and began focusing on her art, deciding to use her collection of fabric as the basis for her creations.

“With fabric, I design land- and seascapes,” she said of the unique art. “I use sewing and appliqué techniques to create each picture, then attach each piece to a stretcher frame. Each piece is an original — no two are exactly alike.”

From May to September, Itzel enters art shows in both Delaware and Maryland to showcase her scenic landscapes derived from both what she sees in nature and what she comes up with using her own imagination. Some of her more notable pieces include “Under the Sea,” “Night” and “Trees.”

Operation SEAs the Day prepares for Warrior Beach Week

Coastal Point • Submitted: Operation SEAs the Day participants enjoy a personal watercraft ride in the Indian River Bay.Coastal Point • Submitted: Operation SEAs the Day participants enjoy a personal watercraft ride in the Indian River Bay.The Bethany Beach area has become a place of respite and peace for many visitors — so much so that a number of nonprofit organizations are doing their part to offer this slice of heaven to people who might not otherwise be able to visit.

Operation SEAs the Day is a nonprofit organization whose mission is “to organize and facilitate a beach week event for our wounded soldiers and their families as a means of showing our appreciation for their service and sacrifice. It is our hope that such a community-based gesture of support will be comforting and help ease their transition back into civilian life.”

Struggling with headaches?

If you’re struggling with headaches, you’re not alone. The real question is who hasn’t had a headache? The painful answer is they are all too common. The National Headache Foundation says that more than 45 million Americans suffer from more than just an occasional headache. They’re dealing with recurring, chronic headaches every year.

Maryland-filmed Western to premiere at Clayton

Special to the Coastal Point • Submitted: ‘Day of the Gun’ will be shown at the Clayton Theater in Dagsboro on Saturday, May 24, and Monday, May 26.Special to the Coastal Point • Submitted: ‘Day of the Gun’ will be shown at the Clayton Theater in Dagsboro on Saturday, May 24, and Monday, May 26.Dust off those spurs and don’t forget the popcorn as the Clayton Theatre presents “Day of the Gun,” a Western-style film created next door in Maryland. The Clayton will host the Delaware premiere at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 24, and at 7 p.m. on Monday, May 26, followed by a discussion with the filmmakers.

The live-action movie starts as the tough widowed ranch owner Maggie Carter (LaDon Hall) demands that local cattle baron Cyrus McCall (Jim Osborn) remove a barbed-wire fence he installed to deter rustlers.

She promises, “There will be Hell to pay” if it doesn’t come down, since it blocks her herd from open grazing lands. Complications arise between their sons, who were once best friends, until Maggie’s son ends up dead. Desperate, Maggie brings in a dark stranger (Academy Award nominee Eric Roberts) from her past to even the score.

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