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‘Jeopardy’-style trivia hitting Millsboro library

“You think you know, but you have no idea.”

While local history-hounds won’t have to phrase any answers in the form of a question, there’ll be plenty of them asked when Elkton, Md.-based storyteller Ed Okonowicz appears at the Millsboro Pubic Library for “So You Think You Know All about Delaware?” on Monday, March 20.

Free bilingual paralegal service benefits Selbyville

Because of the large number of non-English-speaking crime victims locally, Community Legal Aid Society Inc., will now provide free bilingual paralegal services once a week at Selbyville Town Hall.

“We’re pretty proud. It’s us and Seaford. We’re one of two towns doing that,” Selbyville Police Chief W. Scott Collins told the town council on March 12.

Smoke test coming to a Fenwick Island sewer near you

Officials concerned of stormwater leaks

Concerned that stormwater may be leaking into the Fenwick Island sewer system, officials are proposing to smoke out the problem.

Editorial — Crime in area forces us to take extra care

It’s not a difficult leap to equate a rise in home and car burglaries with the massive uptick in opioid use and abuse in the community over recent years. People become addicted, they want more drugs after they have exhausted their own resources and they move on to taking things from other people to satisfy their addictions.

Letters to the Editor — March 17, 2017

Reader offers congrats for referendum

Editor:

Congratulations to the IRSD, and Mark Steele in particular, for their success with the second referendum. Superintendent Steele did indeed hustle for yes votes everywhere within the IRSD boundaries. He was indeed working 13-plus hours daily.

Civil War Profiles — Out of Ireland, into the Union army

St. Patrick’s Day is an appropriate time to recognize the more than 200,000 men born in Ireland who fought on behalf of the North and South during the Civil War. By far, however, the predominant number of Irish served in the Union army.

Morning Buns: A family’s sweet dream come true

Coastal Point photos • Tyler Valliant: Lynn and Kylee Rickards pose for a photo in the new bake shop.Coastal Point photos • Tyler Valliant: Lynn and Kylee Rickards pose for a photo in the new bake shop.Kylee Rickards’ eyes light up as she describes the process of making the impossibly delicate layers of pastry that make up her croissants.

“You just keep folding them over and over on each other,” said the Culinary Institute of America graduate, who recently opened the Morning Buns Bake Shop in Ocean View, alongside her mother, Lynn Rickards. Her voice actually takes on a quiet reverence when she talks about the eight-hour process by which she transforms layers of pastry dough into buttery perfection.

“Croissants are my babies,” said Kylee, who went off to the CIA in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., after graduating from Sussex Technical High School.

The pair opened Morning Buns on Jan. 23, in a 1920s-era cottage on Atlantic Avenue (Route 26). While it wasn’t the location they had initially sought, the little house has turned out to be a perfect fit for the bakery. Its bright yellow exterior leads to an equally sunny coral and butter yellow interior, with pale green accents here and there.

On a recent morning, sun streamed through the bakery windows, glinting off the bakery case and its jewel-like contents. The sunlight gave a sugary sheen to croissants and danishes, cookies and scones. The aromas of cinnamon and coffee fill the air.

Kylee, whose studies at CIA concentrated on baking and pastries, said she arrives at the bakery each morning by around 4:30 a.m. to start on the day’s offerings. It’s a labor of love for her, and after a few years in New York and Washington, D.C., working in the quality-control side of the bakery business, she welcomed the chance to get her hands back into the butter and flour.

Local author aims to thrill readers in ‘Third Haven’

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Selbyville author B.B. Shamp smiles with her new novel ‘Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit’ at a book signing at Energy Gym.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Selbyville author B.B. Shamp smiles with her new novel ‘Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit’ at a book signing at Energy Gym.After an explosion shakes the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, a woman escapes to the Eastern Shore with her young son. She spends the next 280 pages figuring out what’s happening and why an unnamed evil is following her.

Local author B.B. Shamp used bits of her own traumatic — but slightly less dramatic — experiences to inform her new book, “Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit.”

In 2008, Shamp fell off a ladder in her D.C. home. In the hospital with a broken back, she suffered a massive pulmonary embolism, then major organ failure. Doctors induced a coma, but Shamp still faced a near-death experience and saw the fabled white light.

That could be a lot to carry when a person wakes up and must re-learn how to walk and speak, hampered by PTSD and a traumatic brain injury.

Over four years, she used “Third Haven” as a map to help understand herself and bury breadcrumbs of trauma and intrigue for readers to follow that journey.

The novel’s initial explosion shakes the main character, Claire, from her everyday frustrations and tosses her into a rollicking plot that pushes her from Maryland’s Eastern Shore to coastal Delaware.

“The plot is engaging … and there are a lot of clues as to who the antagonist is,” Shamp said.

Tripple Overtime: ‘The Return of Captain Blood’ and other R. Chris Clark-less spring stories

It’s a phrase I never imagined I’d be able to use with a straight face: “Man — I could really use the help of R. Chris Clark right about now.”

‘A Few Great Men’

Gerken, Conover, Mercer inducted as first IR soccer HOF class

Coastal Point • File Photo: From left, former IR head coach Howard Gerken, IR graduate Josh Mercer, current IR head coach Steve Kilby and IR graduate Chris Conover take part in the Indian River High School Soccer Hall of Fame induction ceremony held on Thursday, March 9.Coastal Point • File Photo: From left, former IR head coach Howard Gerken, IR graduate Josh Mercer, current IR head coach Steve Kilby and IR graduate Chris Conover take part in the Indian River High School Soccer Hall of Fame induction ceremony held on Thursday, March 9.There are two stars adorning the sleeves of Indian River High School soccer jackets. The stars stand as symbols — the program’s way of honoring its rich history and two state championship teams: the first in 2013, the other in 2015.

Recently, however, the Soccer Boosters at Indian River came up with a new way of honoring past stars — the ones who aren’t specifically mentioned on the prideful coats of current IR soccer lettermen and coaches yet still shine brightly from their days in green and gold and as one of the main reasons for the program’s development and continued success.

Last Thursday, March 9, three of those stars — Howard Gerken, Christopher Conover and Josh Mercer — got a chance to shine once again when they were officially honored as the first class of the Indian River High School Soccer Hall of Fame.

Central grad Long trades in blue for green to lead IR baseball squad

Indians set sights on South title

Coastal Point • Tripp Colonell: Sussex Central grad D.J. Long takes over as coach for the Indian River High School baseball team this season.Coastal Point • Tripp Colonell: Sussex Central grad D.J. Long takes over as coach for the Indian River High School baseball team this season.On his first day of practice after taking over the Indian River High School baseball team, first-year head coach D.J. Long told his squad of his playing days at long-time district rival Sussex Central.

Understandably, he was booed.

But while the gesture was made in jest, it also served as the ice-breaking introduction for the former-Golden Knight-turned-Indian, as he swaps out the blue in his blue-and-gold for green, boos for cheers, and aims to get the Indians back to the playoffs for the first time since 2011.

“It is different. I did have to update my wardrobe — it was all blue and gold,” said Long with a laugh. “Now, the Central game is definitely going to be a game I look forward to. I’m excited for that.”

Ocean View’s Lydic headed to Augusta

Bear Trap Dunes to host Drive, Chip & Put viewing party

Coastal Point • Submitted by Mike McGown: Ocean View’s Sarah Lydic is headed to Augusta, Ga., for the Drive, Chip & Putt national finals on Sunday, April 2.Coastal Point • Submitted by Mike McGown: Ocean View’s Sarah Lydic is headed to Augusta, Ga., for the Drive, Chip & Putt national finals on Sunday, April 2.Ocean View’s very own Sarah Lydic will soon be headed to Augusta for the national finals of the Drive, Chip & Putt challenge; and her home club at Bear Trap Dunes is ready to watch her tee off on the national stage.

Bear Trap will host a viewing party and brunch at their restaurant, The Den at Bear Trap Dunes, where fans can watch the event unfold live on the Golf Channel and celebrate the occasion when it gets under way next month.

Lydic earned her way to the home of the Masters after placing first overall in the Girls’ 10-11 division at a regional qualifying event held at Oakmont Country Club in Oakmont, Pa.

New attitude, new expectations for IR girls’ lax in second year

Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: The Indian River High School girls’ lacrosse team has high hopes for their second varsity season.Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: The Indian River High School girls’ lacrosse team has high hopes for their second varsity season.Last year, there was a new team. This year, there’s a new attitude.

Relying heavily on seasoned vets, such as Blue-Gold All-Star selection Emiley Shuey, in 2016, first-year head coach Kelsea Ayers and an inexperienced Indian River High School girls’ lacrosse squad still managed to win five games during their varsity season.

But despite graduating their leading scorer, the new-look Indians are aiming to double their win total and make a run at the playoffs this spring, with a full year of experience and new commitment to getting the program off the ground.

“Last year, as a beginning team, it was definitely more of relying on just a couple of players. This year, we’ve all improved as a team, so I don’t think this year will be just one person stepping up — I think it will be more of a whole team coming together,” explained senior Lexi Haden. “Instead of one person taking [Shuey’s] place, it’s going to be all 12 of us on the field being one.”

Extra Points — March 17, 2017

Bomhardt back on the diamond, tallies first career NCAA hit, run

Flying over Delaware beaches — now and then

Coastal Point • Submitted: Joe Hudson flying his Navion Range Master.Coastal Point • Submitted: Joe Hudson flying his Navion Range Master.Joe Hudson began his flying career while still in high school, during the 1940s, as a student fish-spotter. Today he is known as “dean of Delaware crop-dusters.”

By the summer of 2016, Cape Henlopen High School students had been flying camera drones and taking pictures of the Delaware beaches, including the World War II towers, for almost two years.

Thanks to a very unique photography class and enthusiastic art teacher, Jason Fruchtman, the students have learned to master the camera drone and create stunning images.

More than 70 years ago, Lewes High School students were quite literally flying over the same beaches for a very different reason. It was not a class. They were at work, fish-spotting. Just how did these guys get to do this?

Bethany council to look at beach rules this week

Bethany Beach Town Council members will look at a series of proposed changes to the rules for the town’s beach this week, at their March council workshop, set for Tuesday, March 14, at 11 a.m. at town hall.

New stage on the way

Revamped Freeman stage unveils 10th-season lineup March 15

The daffodils are up, the robins have returned, the beach communities are stretching, yawning and coming back to life. Spring is right around the corner, and summer will be here before we know it. As winter ends and the sun begins to warm the sand and the fields again, there is a question crackling through offices and gyms and supermarkets...

Who’s coming to the Freeman Stage this year?

IRSD referendum passes with record turnout

Overwhelmed LB turned to paper ballots

Voters were waiting in line before the polls even opened March 2 at six schools in the Indian River School District. But despite the long lines and a last-minute switch to paper votes, and with a lot of public debate, 57 percent of the public voted to approve IRSD’s current-expense referendum.

Frankford shows off new town hall at former J.P. court

The Town of Frankford this week held its monthly town council meeting not in the Frankford Volunteer Fire Company’s meeting room, as it has for more than five years, but in the building next door that formerly housed a J.P. Court. However, it’s no longer a court building — it’s the new town hall.

County council discusses state budget, reassessment

Sussex County officials are looking ahead at the possibility of a statewide property reassessment and potential impacts at the county government level as state officials work to prepare a 2018-fiscal-year budget that they hope will address a $350 million state budget shortfall coming in to Gov. John Carney’s term.

Millsboro Chamber hosting annual bridal show this Sunday

The Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce has couples-to-be covered this weekend, as the Chamber will host the 22nd Annual Central Sussex Bridal Show this Sunday, March 12, from noon to 3 p.m. at Cripple Creek Golf & Country Club.

“Every year, we see more vendors, new vendors who have never been in,” said Amy Simmons, the Chamber’s executive director.

Local woman thanked for being a teacher who made impact

Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: Steve Shaner, left, reunites with Dorothy Fisch, his former eighth-grade English teacher, whom he had not seen since 1968.Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: Steve Shaner, left, reunites with Dorothy Fisch, his former eighth-grade English teacher, whom he had not seen since 1968.The meeting place seemed appropriate.

After all, college professor Steve Shaner wanted to thank someone who had opened up his eyes to the power of words.

And so it was that Shaner, 62, walked into the Frankford Public Library on Tuesday, March 7, and got to thank his eighth-grade English teacher.

He had not seen Dorothy Fisch, who now lives in Ocean View, since he finished eighth grade back in 1968. After all that time, his search for Fisch was started by remarks by a colleague who encouraged students and staff at Harding University, in Searcy, Ark., where Shaner is employed as an assistant professor of mass communication, to reach out to someone who had made a difference in their lives, and to thank them.

Exterminator scam terminated before real damage done

This scam is a real pest, for citizens and contractors.

Fenwick Island police recently encountered a new kind of scam involving pest control. In this scam, the perpetrator asks a pest control company to check for mice in what is supposedly a relative’s home. When the exterminator arrives at the victim’s house, they call the perpetrator back to set up payment.

Moffitt joins Weidman law firm

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: Jay Moffit Esq. has joined the Law Office of Susan Pittard Weidman. A graduate of Cape Henlopen High School, Moffitt said he is excited to be back in Sussex County.Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: Jay Moffit Esq. has joined the Law Office of Susan Pittard Weidman. A graduate of Cape Henlopen High School, Moffitt said he is excited to be back in Sussex County.After spending 16 years away from Sussex County, working in corporate law, Lewes native Jay Moffitt Esq. has returned, joining the Law Office of Susan Pittard Weidman.

Moffit graduated from Cape Henlopen High School in 1992 and went on to receive a bachelor’s degree in business management from the University of Delaware in 1997. Upon graduation, he matriculated to Duke University School of Law, from which he graduated in 2001.

“When I graduated from the University of Delaware, I thought it sounded like an interesting field,” he said. “It’s academically challenging, in a way, to be a lawyer.”

During law school, Moffitt clerked at Morris, Nichols, Arsht & Tunnell LLP in Delaware, as well at Simpson Thatcher & Bartlett LLP in New York. Upon graduation, he went to work for Simpson Thatcher, focusing on corporate transactional work and corporate litigation.

“I kept in touch with some of the partners I met at Morris, Nichols after that summer. When I decided I wanted to come back to Delaware, I reached out to them, was interviewed, and I got the job,” said Moffitt, who worked in Wilmington from 2005 to January 2017.

During his time at Morris, Nichols, Moffitt focused on corporate and commercial litigation, and he was made partner in 2011.

Prisons must be a top priority for the state

The recent violent and deadly riot at the James T. Vaughn Correctional Center in Smyrna, and the subsequent mass exodus of correctional officers from that facility, brings to light a topic that finds itself in and out of the Delaware news cycle consistently over the years.

Hard workers get their special day in the sun

There are numerous reasons I love my job.

It’s an outlet for me to pursue my love of grassroots community journalism, in a community that I adore and plan on raising my daughter in until she’s prepared to set her own course. I get the chance to work alongside the best newspaper publisher I have known in my 25 years in the business, and there have honestly never been two days in this job that are exactly alike.

Letters to the Editor — March 10, 2016r

Sorority thankful for support with event

Editor:

Thank you, thank you, thank you to the following community partners who supported Beta Sigma Phi-Alpha Alpha Chapter and our January Jam held at Mango’s in Bethany.

Celtic music to fill library ahead of St. Patrick’s Day

Those looking for a way to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day next week can head to the South Coastal Library on March 14.

Melissa Heieie and Susan Ryan, a duo known as Willow Tree, will give a Celtic music concert that Tuesday at 2 p.m. in meeting rooms A and B.

Special-education staff gets the spotlight

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: For their devotion to Indian River School District’s most vulnerable populations, these staff members were voted leaders in IRSD special education.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: For their devotion to Indian River School District’s most vulnerable populations, these staff members were voted leaders in IRSD special education.“Above and beyond” were the words most frequently used to describe 17 individuals who were named Special Education Ambassadors this week.

The Indian River School District honored educators who serve as role models for their colleagues while promoting a positive message of inclusiveness for students with disabilities.

“Ambassadors will be those who clearly support a mission to allow students identified with disabilities to become emotionally, socially and academically successful learners ready to fulfill their lifelong goals,” according to IRSD officials.

“[These are] folks in our schools who really make it possible for our students to achieve their goals,” said IRSD Board Member Heather Statler.

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