Ocean View News

Town of Ocean View, Delaware

Population:

  • 1882 (2010 Census)

Town council meetings:

  • Second Tuesday of the month, 7 p.m.; town hall meeting room

Planning & Zoning meets:

  • Third Thursday of the month, 7 p.m., town hall meeting room

Elections:

  • Second Saturday in April; mayor is elected separately from council members, at the same time; council members run by district, but voters can vote for candidates in any district; two-term limits on mayor and council

Town office:

  • 201 Central Avenue, Ocean View, DE 19970; (302) 539-9797

Web site

General e-mail inquiries

Town Council:

  • Walter Curran, Mayor
  • William Olsen, Distrcit 1
  • Frank Twardzik, District 2
  • Tom Maly, District 3
  • Carol Bodine, District 4

Town Manager:

  • Dianne Vogel

Town Clerk:

  • Donna Schwartz, CMC

Finance Director:

  • Lee Brubaker

Administrative Official:

  • Charles McMullen

Standing committees:

  • Planning Commission
  • Board of Adjustments
  • Board of Elections

Police:

  • Ken McLaughlin, Chief

Town Solicitor:

  • Dennis Schrader

Emergency:

  • 911

Non-emergency police contact:

  • (302) 539-1111

Water service:

  • Central water service is active and connection is mandatory.

Trash pick-up:

  • No municipal trash service; private haulers, with varied collection days

Recycling:

  • No townwide recycling; curbside recycling offered in conjunction with trash pick-up by haulers (statewide)

Former OV employee loses appeal

A former Town of Ocean View employee recently lost an appeal to the Delaware Superior Court after the Unemployment Insurance Appeal Board found she was disqualified for unemployment benefits.

LB students get help from women’s group

Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: Women from the Bishop’s Landing development used donations they collected to fill 40 backpacks for students at Lord Baltimore Elementary School.Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: Women from the Bishop’s Landing development used donations they collected to fill 40 backpacks for students at Lord Baltimore Elementary School.More than four dozen students at Lord Baltimore Elementary School will receive backpacks filled with school supplies to start their school year, thanks to the efforts of a group of local women.

The idea for the backpack project came about as a group of women who live in the Bishop’s Landing development collected their usual money for local charities during their monthly luncheon. The women decided that they wanted to contribute backpacks and came up with filling 50 packs as their goal.

First, the backpacks themselves were purchased, and into each one was placed a supplies list for one of the grades at Lord Baltimore, which encompasses kindergarten through fifth grade. The individual backpacks were then taken by households in Bishop’s Landing and filled with everything from dry erase markers to earbuds.

Ocean View Historical Society to hold ’50s Boardwalk Bash

History buffs and those just wanting a fun night out can return to a quieter, simpler time at the Ocean View Historical Society’s ’50s Boardwalk Bash, reliving an era when gals wore poodle skirts and guys slicked their hair back just-so.

Millsboro man charged with seventh DUI after OVPD stop

The Ocean View Police Department recently charged a Millsboro man with his seventh DUI offense.

OV BOA approves special exception

The Ocean View Board of Adjustment this week unanimously approved a special exception for a physical therapy/rehabilitation facility, to be located at 111 Atlantic Avenue, Unit 3.

Robert Hammond, owner of Atlantic Physical Therapy, told the board that he and his family have six other locations — the closest being in West Fenwick.

Ocean View discusses ambulance fees, speeding and more

Ocean View officials met with the Millville Volunteer Fire Company recently to discuss a proposed contract for the $35-per-property ambulance service fee proposed by the fire company.

Ocean View approves variances for businesses

The Ocean View Board of Adjustment last week approved two applications for local businesses, granting approval for additional medical offices and for a ramp for a bakery.

Protect the paramedics

Medics and police train for active shooter scenarios

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Paramedics Stephanie Davis and Jay Pawelek examine a mock casualty for treatment.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Paramedics Stephanie Davis and Jay Pawelek examine a mock casualty for treatment.Police officers swept across Lord Baltimore Elementary School, guns raised, as teams of paramedics scuttled behind them.

Delaware’s first Rescue Task Force was training on June 28 for the horrible — and, hopefully, unlikely — day that an active shooter requires massive police and medical response.

Emergency response has changed from the days of the shooting at Columbine High School in Colorado, when police secured a perimeter and waited for SWAT teams to lead the charge into a hot zone. Now, police officers run straight in, too.

But while police deal with the immediate danger, EMTs are best suited to treat the victims left in the dust.

Gallery One opens new show ‘Bold & Bright’

Coastal Point • Submitted: Nina Mickelsen’s ‘Beach Cabanas,’ a mixed-media artwork will be featured during Gallery One’s ‘Bright & Bold’ show, open until Aug.­ 2.Coastal Point • Submitted: Nina Mickelsen’s ‘Beach Cabanas,’ a mixed-media artwork will be featured during Gallery One’s ‘Bright & Bold’ show, open until Aug.­ 2.Gallery One in Ocean View this week announced the theme of their July exhibit, “Bold & Bright,” which will be open until Aug. 2.

Bright coupled with bold commands attention that is almost impossible to ignore, and many artists like that. In fact, artists often exaggerate bright and bold, so viewers just can’t miss it, and sometimes the viewer experiences a new way of seeing, a heightened experience or an “I never noticed that before” realization that forever changes the way they look at the world.

Summer gardens reveal an abundance of bold and bright colors and shapes. Laura Hickman grows beautiful zinnias every summer.

“My zinnia garden always provides the brightest and boldest summer colors. Nature’s color combinations are always an inspiration,” she explained.

“Zinnia,” her pastel painting, invites the viewer to enjoy her zinnia garden on a summer’s day.

“Red Flowers” is the subject of Joyce Condry’s acrylic.

BREAKING NEWS: Police seek suspects in robbery of Ocean View package store

Delaware State Police troopers are investigating the robbery of Hickman’s Package Store late on Monday evening.

Police said the incident occurred around 10:10 p.m. Monday, June 20, when two male suspects entered the package store, located at 30447 Cedar Neck Road, with at least one subject armed with an unknown type of handgun.

Ocean View drainage project nears its completion

Ocean View Public Works Director Charles McMullen told the town council on Tuesday that Phase I of the Country Village drainage project is all but complete, save for roadway repairs. He said those repairs would take place in about two to three weeks, allowing the road some time to settle.

Community invited to 24-hour prayer vigil at Mariner's Bethel

“Lots and lots of prayer is going out to the community this weekend,” said Linda Gundersen, a member of Mariner’s Bethel United Methodist Church, which will be holding a 24-hour prayer vigil this weekend.

Local emergency services, law enforcement train together

Last week, the Bethany Beach Volunteer Fire Company and the Bethany Beach Police Department, along with the Ocean View Police Department and South Bethany Police Department, joined together for a three-day training session on tactical emergency casualty care (TECC).

LB Lions Club to hold yard sale June 18

The Lord Baltimore Lions Club will hold their annual Yard Sale on Saturday, June 18, at Lord Baltimore Elementary School on Atlantic Avenue in Ocean View, from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.

BREAKING NEWS: OVPD seeks drug suspect after he flees on foot from traffic stop

Jamar A. Manuel, 26, is being sought by Ocean View police after fleeing a traffic stop with suspected drugs in the vehicle.

The Ocean View Police Department is seeking the public’s assistance in locating 27-year-old Jamar A. Manuel of Frankford, after he allegedly fled on foot from police when stopped for driving on a suspended/revoked license.

Traffic stop in OV leads to heroin arrest

Following a routine traffic stop in Ocean View, the Ocean View Police Department was recently able to recover 1.5 grams of suspected heroin from Ocean View resident Jennifer Zimmerman.

Curran pens first novel

Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: Walter Curran with his first novel, ‘Young Mariner’ and his first book of poetry, ‘Slice of Life: Cerebral Spasms of the Soul’.Coastal Point • Shaun M. Lambert: Walter Curran with his first novel, ‘Young Mariner’ and his first book of poetry, ‘Slice of Life: Cerebral Spasms of the Soul’.Having worked in the maritime field for more than 40 years, Walter Curran knows a thing or two about the marine industry.

“It was a life that I loved,” said Curran. “It’s been my life. It really has.”

As a graduate of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy in 1966, he was licensed as a third mate and was also commissioned as an ensign in the Navy Reserve. Curran spent four years at sea.

“At that point in time, being a city kid who never had two nickels to rub together prior to that, I thought I’d died and gone to heaven. They were paying me to travel around the world and have a vacation. That’s literally the way I looked at it,” he said.

OVPD Hopkins and Hardy K-9 team receive national certifications

Coastal Point • File Photo: PFC Justin Hopkins and K-9 Hardy during a training exercise last year.Coastal Point • File Photo: PFC Justin Hopkins and K-9 Hardy during a training exercise last year.Earlier this year, municipal K-9 teams throughout the state received national certification in explosive and narcotic scent detection by the National Police Canine Association (NPCA), including the Ocean View Police Department’s PFC Justin Hopkins and K-9 Hardy.

Nine other municipal K-9 teams, from Newark, Lewes, Bridgeville, Smyrna, Harrington and Dover, also received the certification, and 14 Delaware State Police (DSP) K-9 teams completed the patrol and narcotics certifications. Additionally, 12 Delaware State Police K-9 teams and four municipal K-9 teams from the Capitol Police Department and Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Control completed the patrol and explosive certifications.

“A dog cannot be an explosive and drug dog. It’s one or the other, because when they hit on something, they can’t tell you, ‘I smell a bomb,’ or ‘I smell marijuana,’” explained OVPD Cpl. Rhys Bradshaw.

The Delaware State Police K-9 teams, along with the New Castle County Police Department and the Wilmington Police Department K-9 teams, train law enforcement K-9 teams in the state under one certification standard for both explosive and narcotic scent detection. Certification scenarios for patrol included K-9 obedience, tracking, building searches, vehicle searches and wooded area searches.

Beach towns short on sand but ready for summer

It’s here! The unofficial start of the summer season at the Delaware shore has arrived with Memorial Day weekend, and it’s a time of transition for the area, as the relatively quiet second season of spring sprouts into the hustle and bustle that is the resort area’s high season.

Hockers acquire former Harris Teeter property

Coastal Point • Susan Lyons: The Hocker family has reached an agreement to purchase Salt Pond Plaza, which includes the building that formerly housed Harris Teeter.Coastal Point • Susan Lyons: The Hocker family has reached an agreement to purchase Salt Pond Plaza, which includes the building that formerly housed Harris Teeter.In a mystery that rivaled “Who shot J.R.?” and “Did Lee Harvey Oswald act alone?” the future of the former Harris Teeter building near Salt Pond has finally been answered.

Well, to some extent.

Gerry Hocker, former Millville mayor and one of the owners of Hocker’s Super Center, and G&E Grocery and Hardware stores, told the Coastal Point earlier this week that his family has agreed to terms to purchase the Salt Pond Plaza, including the building that formerly housed Harris Teeter before that store closed its doors in February 2015.

Night work to begin on Route 113 and 26 road projects

To accommodate the holiday traffic, major road projects in the area have been put on hold from Thursday, May 26, to Monday, May 30. After that, lane closures will be prohibited on Route 26 and Route 113 during peak daytime hours.

Meet the artisans of the 2016 Artisans Fair

Photo courtesy • Maureen Dyer Ickrath Photography: A photograph of the Indian River Inlet Bridge with fireworks overhead by Maureen Dyer Ickrath Photography. Ickrath will be at the Lord Baltimore Elementary School for the 2016 Artisans Fair on Saturday, May 28.Photo courtesy • Maureen Dyer Ickrath Photography: A photograph of the Indian River Inlet Bridge with fireworks overhead by Maureen Dyer Ickrath Photography. Ickrath will be at the Lord Baltimore Elementary School for the 2016 Artisans Fair on Saturday, May 28.Some of the area’s most innovative crafters will be showing off their work when the 2016 Artisans Fair gets under way at Lord Baltimore Elementary School in Ocean View on Saturday, May 28.

Now in its ninth year, the fair will feature an array of different artistic mediums, including pottery, fiberwork, jewelry, ceramics, woodwork, metalwork, photography, paintings, glass, candles, baskets, needlepoint and more.

Per usual, proceeds from the event will benefit the South Coastal Delaware AARP chapter, to help provide college scholarships for local students.

After seeing more than 1,200 attendees at last year’s show, this year’s show promises to be as popular as ever, with 53 exhibitors — some new to the venue, and some returning seasoned vets.

“As our reputation has grown over the past nine years, we attract some of the best artisans,” said fair coordinator Ione Phillips. “Because our exhibitors do so well at the show, most of them return year after year, and we have a waiting list of others who want to participate.”

Here are just a few of the participants ready to showcase their work at this year’s show:

Hocker's acquire former Harris Teeter property

Mystery solved!

Speculation has run rampant over what would happen with the Harris Teeter building near Salt Pond since that company announced they were closing their doors there in February 2015.

Sussex Central grad joins Ocean View Police Department

Coastal Point • Shaun Lambert: Patrolman Troy Bowden is the newest addition to the Ocean View Police Department. A member of the Delaware State Police Explorers Program as a youth, Bowden has long had his eye on a career in law enforcement.Coastal Point • Shaun Lambert: Patrolman Troy Bowden is the newest addition to the Ocean View Police Department. A member of the Delaware State Police Explorers Program as a youth, Bowden has long had his eye on a career in law enforcement.If you see a new officer patrolling the streets of Ocean View, chances are it’s patrolman Troy Bowden.

“We’re excited to have him,” said Ocean View Police Chief Ken McLaughlin.

Bowden started with the department on May 2 and will be doing field training with other OVPD officers for a total of five weeks before he may patrol on his own. A Georgetown native, Bowden has been interested in law enforcement since he was in high school.

“When I was in high school, I was part of the Delaware State Police Explorers Program,” he said. “It’s for young women and men who have an interest in law enforcement. I was in that my 10th-grade year in high school, and started learning how to do routine patrol, traffic stops, learning the 10 codes — how to communicate over the radio. And I just had the urge to learn more.”

VFW post’s 70th anniversary to include founding members

In researching the 70-year history of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7234, Jerry Hardiman has discovered a theme of selflessness running though longtime members.

The VFW was founded in 1946, primarily by World War II veterans. It was an organized effort to answer the questions, “How can we help our veterans? How can we help people in need in the community?” Hardiman said.