Our Towns

The Coastal Point covers news and events in Bethany Beach, South Bethany, Fenwick Island, Ocean View, Millville, Frankford, Selbyville and Dagsboro, Del., as well as the larger area of southeastern Sussex County, from the Delaware state line north to the Indian River Inlet and from the coast inland to Millsboro.

Our focus is truly local, with local reporters attending nearly all official meetings in each of our towns, as well as following news and events in the area’s non-incorporated communities.

We invite you to visit our town and other governmental pages below to get information about them and their citizens, and to read news and other stories from each of them.

Ocean View council discusses 2016-fiscal-year budget

The Ocean View Town Council reviewed its first draft of the Town’s budget for the 2016 fiscal year this week.

“This is our first draft… It’s going to change,” emphasized Finance Director Lee Brubaker.

‘Frozen’ train adventure arrives at Salted Rim

Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark: The Salted Rim in Ocean View hosts families at their ‘Frozen’ adventure show onboard one of their trains. Here, Elsa dances around as the families enjoy the show.Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark: The Salted Rim in Ocean View hosts families at their ‘Frozen’ adventure show onboard one of their trains. Here, Elsa dances around as the families enjoy the show. Visit http://coastalpoint.zenfolio.com/p337602837 for more photos.Margaritas aren’t the only thing “frozen” at the Salted Rim restaurant in Ocean View.

Families can now enjoy a Disney’s “Frozen” adventure aboard the railroad cars lining Route 26, which are decked in silver, blue and white tulle and icicles.

“It’s cold outside. It’s a frozen movie. It gives families something to do,” Karen Fritz, owner of the late-night Tex-Mex place.

“I think it’s gonna be awesome. I think they’re gonna love it,” as will the families, to see their children so happy, Fritz said. “That’s what you do it for — the kids! The excitement.”

Large-screen televisions will show the movie on the train cars several times daily, with a dinner buffet, each weekend through March 15.

Ocean View to review resurfacing, police receive grants

The Town of Ocean View will be reviewing the micro-resurfacing done in a number of town developments in 2013, after receiving a letter from Kent Liddle, president of The Village at Bear Trap Dunes Owners Association.

‘Paint What You Love’ is on display at Gallery One through March 3

Artists find that their work is more expressive, energetic, soulful and successful, when they paint what they love. For the January/February’s exhibit theme, Gallery One partners painted subjects that were special to them.

BART donates DVD’s of theatre productions to South Coastal Library

Rusty Hesse, a member of the advisory committee of the Bethany Area Repertory Theatre (BART) and Bob Davis founder of BART and local playwright, recently presented seven DVDs to Susan Keefe, director of the South Coastal Library. The DVD’s are of plays written by Davis and presented at Dickens Parlour Theatre in Millville and other locations in the Delmarva area.

OVPD adds training and K-9 officer to anti-heroin initiative

The Ocean View Police Department has been working on its own initiative to help combat the heroin problem that has been plaguing the town, state and country.

K-9 Hardy welcomed to OVPD

“For him, this isn’t work — it’s play,” said Ocean View Police Department Officer Justin Hopkins of his new partner, Hardy.

Route 26 detour begins Monday­­

Route 26 will close in two locations for construction, starting Monday, Jan. 5. The three-month closure is scheduled to end March 30.

Two bridge culverts must be replaced where Route 26 crosses water, just east of Millville Town Hall and just east of Lord Baltimore Elementary School.

OVPD first in state to carry drug to treat overdoses

Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark: Naloxone Hydrochloride, or ‘Narcan,’ can counteract the effects of an overdose of opioid drugs, legal or otherwise.Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark: Naloxone Hydrochloride, or ‘Narcan,’ can counteract the effects of an overdose of opioid drugs, legal or otherwise.A few weeks ago, if an Ocean View police officer arrived on the scene of a suspected drug overdose, they were unable to administer naloxone hydrochloride — more commonly known as Narcan — a drug that can counteract the effects of an overdose of opioid drugs, legal or otherwise.

“We’re the first agency in the state to have it. In fact, we’re the only agency in the state to have it,” said OVPD Chief Ken McLaughlin.

All the officers in the department completed a 30-minute online training course, overseen by the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services, prior to being able to receive access to the drug.

“You put it in the nose and give it a squirt, and it counteracts the effects of the overdose,” said McLaughlin of the ease of administering Narcan.

The drug comes as a nasal spray in kits that include sterile gloves and will be kept in the trunks of officers’ cars.

Ocean View police upgrade body camera program

Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark: The Ocean View Police Department secured new Vievu LE3 cameras for their officers, replacing the old ones, which have become outdated.Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark: The Ocean View Police Department secured new Vievu LE3 cameras for their officers, replacing the old ones, which have become outdated.Last month, the Ocean View Police Department purchased body cameras for its officers, but OVPD Chief Ken McLaughlin emphasized that it wasn’t in response to recent discussions nationwide about police interactions with suspects and the public. OVPD officers have been wearing cameras for almost five years.

“We’ve had a body camera program for a couple years now. It’s not what everyone thinks it is — we’re not doing it in response to anything that has happened recently,” said Chief Ken McLaughlin. “We’ve had cameras in every one of our patrols cars for 10 years now, as have most law enforcement agencies in the state of Delaware.”

The new Vievu LE3 cameras are built to military specifications, with an internal microphone, making them more robust than the old ones, which McLaughlin said he hopes will help them last longer. The new cameras were paid for out of the department’s budget and cost approximately $900 each. The older cameras cost approximately $60 each.